One classical piece a day

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Ito Okashi

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One classical piece a day
« on: December 05, 2020, 11:43:12 PM »
In this thread...

1. Everyday I'll post one piece of classical music from any year, from any country, from any style. There will be no order.

2. I'll try to post pieces below 20 minutes if possible, but sometimes I may post something longer.

3. It's free for anyone to interact as pleased or even post any classical music you want to share. Or ignore me.

Hope I'm not breaking any rules.

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Ito Okashi

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Re: One classical piece a day
« Reply #1 on: December 05, 2020, 11:43:22 PM »
Hans Abrahamsen - "Let Me Tell You" (2013)

Interpreted by Barbara Hannigan (singer), Andris Nelsons (conductor) and the Berlin Philharmonic.

If I may start with an advice, wait to listen to this one when you're in a quiet place, in peace. This is due to the ASMR nature of the music, conjuring ambience through very delicate noises, scratches, surprises. Especially because Barbara Hannigan's voice in not merely singing, but shimmering, fluttering, echoing, becoming aether to put you in trance. She's otherworldly. And the music is goddamn tingly, nothing else really does it like this.

"Let Me Tell You" is a song cycle about Ophelia, from Shakespeare's Hamlet, telling her story through the words written and spoken by her in the book, but out of order. Totalling around half an hour of lenght, it's divided in three parts with two or three song in each. It flows like a perfect album from start to finish, so I highly recommend listening to it all. Don't worry, you'll find it on Youtube.

Despite being released quite recently (2013) for the lifespan of classical music, an era when classical is almost completely out of popular culture, this piece quickly gained a lot of recognition and widespread success, deservedly earning the status of an instant classic, and being regarded as one of the most relevant classical pieces of the century, putting Hans Abrahamsen definitely in the map as a revered name.

This is the final song of the cycle, "I will go out now", the greatest payoff, the most transcendental.


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Ito Okashi

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Re: One classical piece a day
« Reply #2 on: December 05, 2020, 11:45:09 PM »
Barbara Hannigan


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MPare1966

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Re: One classical piece a day
« Reply #3 on: December 05, 2020, 11:53:09 PM »
OK. I’ll play  :D

This is the one that got me started on classical music. You’ve probably heard it at some Winter Olympics a few decades ago...

Fun fact: this recording charted in my parts.

First Chair. Last Call.

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Ito Okashi

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Re: One classical piece a day
« Reply #4 on: December 06, 2020, 12:01:31 AM »
Oh, I love Boléro! Such a sensual and alluring piece, just perfect to create a mood, and that's why it's in some many films

Ravel is a top 5 composer to me.

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John Galt

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Re: One classical piece a day
« Reply #5 on: December 06, 2020, 02:19:36 PM »

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WookieeWarrior

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Re: One classical piece a day
« Reply #6 on: December 06, 2020, 04:05:46 PM »
Excited to hear that one you shared, Ito.


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Ito Okashi

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Re: One classical piece a day
« Reply #7 on: December 06, 2020, 08:26:32 PM »
Clair de Lune is such a great piece, and I admire how it doesn't lose its luster despite being overplayed in media. Btw, it is the third movement (of four) from the Suite Bergamasque, which is just as great throughout, but underplayed compared to Clair de Lune.

Excited to hear that one you shared, Ito.[/youtube]

Hope you'll like it. It's pure sensorial stimulation, good with other stuff, lol.

On another subject... Shostakovich is the only composer I have read an entire biography about, by Elizabeth Wilson. It's a great book, mostly told through letters and interviews from people who knew him in person, and it's a fascinating life to showcase the brutality and censorship from the Soviet Union, especially during Stalin's years. Some of Shostakovich's works are borderline heavy metal by pure aggression. I remember falling in love with his work through his first "war symphonies", nº 4, which didn't premiere at the time due to being too aggressive and "anti-nacionalistic". There's a part in the first movement from that symphony which is just so poignant and potent that sometimes I find time just to listen to that segment.

This quartet Wookie shared is a big deal. Another one I really like is his 4th quartet, which is almost a folk tune/dance, very fun to listen to.

Right now I'm trying to figure out what I'll post today.

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Ito Okashi

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Re: One classical piece a day
« Reply #8 on: December 06, 2020, 09:53:08 PM »
Einojuhani Rautavaara - "Cantus Arcticus" (1972)

Interpreted by Mikko Franck and the Orchestre Philharmonique de Radio France.

Also known as Concerto for Birds and Orchestra, the birds do not disappoint. It's beautiful mixtape of singing birds from the Arctic Cycle and other parts of Finland playing during the concerto together with the orchestra, which is the most magical combination possible in order to create an immense and psycodelic atmosphere almost like Mother Earth is engulfing you and you're meeting the spirit of the forest and the skies.

Here, the winds flutter enigmatically to create suspense and mysticism, the strings deliver emotion, and the brass section take you to transcedence. The birds are everywhere in the landscape. Truly a special place... I mean, piece.

"I have often compared composing to gardening. In both processes, one observes and controls organic growth rather than constructing or assembling existing components and elements. I would also like to think that my compositions are rather like ‘English gardens’, freely growing and organic, as opposed to those that are pruned to geometric precision and severity." - Einojuhani Rauvataara, 1999.

That sums it up. Rautavaara is one of the greatest composers of the 20th century, there should be a lot more recognition to his name. Many great pieces besides Cantus Arcticus.


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Ito Okashi

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Re: One classical piece a day
« Reply #9 on: December 06, 2020, 09:56:33 PM »
Einojuhani Rautavaara


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MPare1966

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Re: One classical piece a day
« Reply #10 on: December 06, 2020, 10:03:47 PM »
You pointed me towards this Bach ensemble the other day, Ito. Great stuff.

To the others, just watch this.

First Chair. Last Call.

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imaginary friend

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Re: One classical piece a day
« Reply #11 on: December 06, 2020, 10:45:59 PM »
Talk about peaking early - MFer was 16 when he wrote this.

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pick a station anywhere   http://radio.garden/listen/magic-fm/82GNMn3f

add some fun to your life while learning about music:   https://codepen.io/jakealbaugh/full/qNrZyw

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Ito Okashi

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Re: One classical piece a day
« Reply #12 on: December 07, 2020, 01:37:32 AM »
People are giving the goods here. A lot of variety too.

This is the first time I listen to this Mendelssohn piece (a composer who I neglect a lot, unfortunatelly) and I like it a lot, probably my favorite piece from him. Surreal that he was 16 when he wrote this

Brandeburgo Concertos are just awesome. I always return to Bach.

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John Galt

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Re: One classical piece a day
« Reply #13 on: December 07, 2020, 10:15:28 AM »

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Ito Okashi

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Re: One classical piece a day
« Reply #14 on: December 07, 2020, 05:47:06 PM »
Wait.

John Galt is sharing a chinese man playing an american composer???

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