iTunes debacle epilogue

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laoghaire

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iTunes debacle epilogue
« on: September 01, 2020, 02:16:44 PM »
DISCLAIMER: I'm not making any point whatsoever, certainly not that U2 is "relevant" (they're not) or popular (they aren't) or that the iTunes release was a good idea (almost certainly not). So chill. I just thought this was interesting.

I pulled up California on YT a bit ago because Reasons and found in the comments that there is a new, obviously much smaller, crop of teens discovering SOI.

We're six years post the iTunes debacle, and these younger teens have never heard of it. Most think it was just a weird glitch or that their parents actually loaded the album by choice.

Some of those old iPhones are still in circulation and have been handed down by oarents or older sibs to younger kids. Here are some experiences by this set:

1) Virtually all seem to be working with phones that have no other songs loaded - so parents don't listen to music or at least don't download.

2) A fair number said their moms or older sis used a song from SOI as their alarm. This population tended to, no surprise, find the song annoying, but a few said it grew on them.

3) Several said their parents (almost always dads) played the album in the car while driving them to middle school, and it sounded like the parents just didn't download anything else. This group generally found the album highly nostalgic and had positive feelings.

3) Some kids reported playing Fortnite when suddenly the album started playing. I think there were a few Minecrafters too but I could be wrong about that. Most were annoyed but a few listened and adopted the songs.

4) Some say it just automatically starts playing in their cars when they start it. Again, most find it annoying but a few said it grew on them.

Interestingly, since they assumed it was just a glitch (seriously, nobody in that age group knew the story), even if they found it annoying they aren't *angry* about it and don't harbor feelings of hate toward the band - unlike everybody a few years ago.

Anyway, I just thought that was interesting, both that the auto download is still (a little bit) present today, and that the story is no longer known by the younger set.


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Magnificence

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Re: iTunes debacle epilogue
« Reply #1 on: September 01, 2020, 07:10:22 PM »
its amazing that teens today wouldn't know anything about this

six years is six years though, and in teen years that might seem like a lifetime

interesting stuff that you write though

imagine if all the world boiled down to the life of a teen in youtube comments

i think it might be simpler, no?
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SwimmingSorrows

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Re: iTunes debacle epilogue
« Reply #2 on: September 01, 2020, 07:50:02 PM »
I have had a number of interactions about this from being in Discord servers with people my age and younger.  I'm in a few music servers and am always the resident U2 fan in them.  I've introduced a few people to the band through listening parties and album exchanges.

I'd say about 2/3 of the time when I introduce these people, usually around 16-26, to the band they say something like "oh, U2, aren't they that band that put their album on everyone's phones?"  Some people phrase it like, "wait, do you guys remember when they put their album on everyone's phones?"  Some people say they still don't know how to get it off.  Some people say it's really annoying as you've described.  I am yet to come across a single person who said they listened to it and liked it.  There obviously have to be some people who did that though, and I guess the comments section of SOI songs on YouTube is a pretty good place to find them.

I must confess, I wasn't a fan of the band in 2014.  I was 18 at the time, and I knew my dad liked them.  I knew With or Without You obviously, as well as Sunday Bloody Sunday and Beautiful Day.  I also owned two U2 songs on iTunes.  Elevation (I know), as my dad had played ATYCLB a lot when it came out, and that song had stuck in my head.  I had also seen the Blackberry ad that had Crazy Tonight in it and bought that song based on the riff.  I didn't like the vocals though so didn't listen to it much.  I also kinda knew Vertigo and Still Haven't Found but didn't know who they were by.

I remember hearing about the free U2 album thing and seeing it on my phone.  I listened to the first 3 or 4 songs, not really paying attention, then turned it off.  I didn't delete it or try to.  I wasn't upset by it or anything, but I didn't take to the music either.  I remember seeing the video for Every Breaking Wave at some point and liking the song but thinking it sounded like Coldplay, but that may have been years later, not sure.

I didn't properly get into U2 until college, when I saw this video by a YouTuber I follow, entitled "The Top 5 Worst Moments in U2's Rattle and Hum."


It's a pretty funny video.  The guy making it is a fan of the band but has issues with the movie.  The reason this largely negative video led me to do a deep dive though was that it praises the live performance of Sunday Bloody Sunday from Rattle and Hum.  I looked that up and watched it and was stunned.  After that, I borrowed my dad's copy of The Joshua Tree and listened to the CD in my car.  It took me about two weeks before I got past track 3, as I just listened to the first three songs over and over and over again.  So, for me, a relatively young fan, it wasn't their new music that got me into them, it was the classics. 

I think generally that my generation of music fans is a lot more willing to look back in time than previous generations were.  Partially because it's really easy to listen to almost any old music through streaming.  I hardly know anyone who doesn't listen to old music.  Even the few that do generally avoid it have some old songs they love.
« Last Edit: September 01, 2020, 07:55:50 PM by SwimmingSorrows »
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MPare1966

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Re: iTunes debacle epilogue
« Reply #3 on: September 01, 2020, 08:29:05 PM »
I have had a number of interactions about this from being in Discord servers with people my age and younger.  I'm in a few music servers and am always the resident U2 fan in them.  I've introduced a few people to the band through listening parties and album exchanges.

I'd say about 2/3 of the time when I introduce these people, usually around 16-26, to the band they say something like "oh, U2, aren't they that band that put their album on everyone's phones?"  Some people phrase it like, "wait, do you guys remember when they put their album on everyone's phones?"  Some people say they still don't know how to get it off.  Some people say it's really annoying as you've described.  I am yet to come across a single person who said they listened to it and liked it.  There obviously have to be some people who did that though, and I guess the comments section of SOI songs on YouTube is a pretty good place to find them.

I must confess, I wasn't a fan of the band in 2014.  I was 18 at the time, and I knew my dad liked them.  I knew With or Without You obviously, as well as Sunday Bloody Sunday and Beautiful Day.  I also owned two U2 songs on iTunes.  Elevation (I know), as my dad had played ATYCLB a lot when it came out, and that song had stuck in my head.  I had also seen the Blackberry ad that had Crazy Tonight in it and bought that song based on the riff.  I didn't like the vocals though so didn't listen to it much.  I also kinda knew Vertigo and Still Haven't Found but didn't know who they were by.

I remember hearing about the free U2 album thing and seeing it on my phone.  I listened to the first 3 or 4 songs, not really paying attention, then turned it off.  I didn't delete it or try to.  I wasn't upset by it or anything, but I didn't take to the music either.  I remember seeing the video for Every Breaking Wave at some point and liking the song but thinking it sounded like Coldplay, but that may have been years later, not sure.

I didn't properly get into U2 until college, when I saw this video by a YouTuber I follow, entitled "The Top 5 Worst Moments in U2's Rattle and Hum."


It's a pretty funny video.  The guy making it is a fan of the band but has issues with the movie.  The reason this largely negative video led me to do a deep dive though was that it praises the live performance of Sunday Bloody Sunday from Rattle and Hum.  I looked that up and watched it and was stunned.  After that, I borrowed my dad's copy of The Joshua Tree and listened to the CD in my car.  It took me about two weeks before I got past track 3, as I just listened to the first three songs over and over and over again.  So, for me, a relatively young fan, it wasn't their new music that got me into them, it was the classics. 

I think generally that my generation of music fans is a lot more willing to look back in time than previous generations were.  Partially because it's really easy to listen to almost any old music through streaming.  I hardly know anyone who doesn't listen to old music.  Even the few that do generally avoid it have some old songs they love.

Good stuff SS. Very good stuff. Post of the WeekTM is yours.  :D

But seriously, I see youíre about the same age as my daughter. She was a fan in 2014 (I may had something to do with that...) and of course she didnít mind the freebie album. I donít think it became a favorite of her, but I clearly remember her texting me within the hour after the drop and telling me to go listen to SLABT. She came to know the band during the ATYCLB years and for her, thatís the best. But she went through most of the back catalog and I would call her a casual fan these days.

Sheís coming over this weekend and will introduce us to her new boyfriend. He sells guitars for a living and is also a musician. Apparently, he only listens to rock music made prior to the 90ís. Very eager to get to know him.
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Magnificence

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Re: iTunes debacle epilogue
« Reply #4 on: September 01, 2020, 08:31:34 PM »
Quote
Good stuff SS. Very good stuff. Post of the WeekTM is yours.  :D

 :) i am glad this was finally settled  8)
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laoghaire

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Re: iTunes debacle epilogue
« Reply #5 on: September 01, 2020, 08:53:35 PM »
Good stuff.

I am thinking the posts I found were more like 13-15 year olds but I can't be sure. If I'm right, they would have been 7-9 in 2014. They wouldn't have been aware of it at the time. My kid is in that age group and she def wasn't aware. (I was deeply in the closet as a U2 fan and she didn't find out about them from me).

Of course they could become aware later but for that to happen, U2 has to be a thing their peers are talking about at all, which is obviously not the case. The comments suggested kids who have no idea about anything U2 whatsoever except this album - not that they're Irish, nothing about Bono including his name or existence, no other songs or albums, *nothing*. Just this one mystery album.

SS, I can really see how your story works. The key, I think, is that you were exposed to SBS so you know the song even if you didn't adopt it. Then you see the R&H performance. It's familiar, so you already "get" the song in a way, but holy crap. Yeah, that performance could convert a person. Absolutely.

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SwimmingSorrows

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Re: iTunes debacle epilogue
« Reply #6 on: September 01, 2020, 08:57:11 PM »
Good stuff SS. Very good stuff. Post of the WeekTM is yours.  :D

Eeeyyyyy, also play that boyfriend Achtung Baby, 1991, expand his horizons a bit lol
There's a bible verse,
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Well, if that verse is true,
there's hope for me and you.
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MPare1966

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Re: iTunes debacle epilogue
« Reply #7 on: September 01, 2020, 09:12:18 PM »
Good stuff SS. Very good stuff. Post of the WeekTM is yours.  :D

Eeeyyyyy, also play that boyfriend Achtung Baby, 1991, expand his horizons a bit lol

Thatís the plan. If I like him.  ;D
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laoghaire

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Re: iTunes debacle epilogue
« Reply #8 on: September 01, 2020, 09:29:01 PM »
Polishing or sharpening anything, just in case?

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MPare1966

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Re: iTunes debacle epilogue
« Reply #9 on: September 01, 2020, 09:31:57 PM »
Polishing or sharpening anything, just in case?

Get this: Iím 6í2 and heís apparently taller than me.  :o
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Achtung Baby

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Re: iTunes debacle epilogue
« Reply #10 on: September 01, 2020, 09:41:52 PM »
This was a story when it initially happened and it has likely faded into the background since as more of a footnote now.  U2 will probably continue to be known for the classics first and foremost.  That's fine and is mainly to be expected.  I suppose it's a bonus though if anyone was introduced to the band in this manner.       
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SwimmingSorrows

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Re: iTunes debacle epilogue
« Reply #11 on: September 01, 2020, 10:33:24 PM »
Good stuff.

I am thinking the posts I found were more like 13-15 year olds but I can't be sure. If I'm right, they would have been 7-9 in 2014. They wouldn't have been aware of it at the time. My kid is in that age group and she def wasn't aware. (I was deeply in the closet as a U2 fan and she didn't find out about them from me).

Of course they could become aware later but for that to happen, U2 has to be a thing their peers are talking about at all, which is obviously not the case. The comments suggested kids who have no idea about anything U2 whatsoever except this album - not that they're Irish, nothing about Bono including his name or existence, no other songs or albums, *nothing*. Just this one mystery album.

SS, I can really see how your story works. The key, I think, is that you were exposed to SBS so you know the song even if you didn't adopt it. Then you see the R&H performance. It's familiar, so you already "get" the song in a way, but holy crap. Yeah, that performance could convert a person. Absolutely.

I imagine for most people it comes down to whether or not they had a phone/iPod/computer at the time. 

Also, I think the speech had a lot to do with it.  That's actually why I searched for it, to see the full speech.  That righteous anger, and the righteous anger behind the whole performance, is intoxicating.
There's a bible verse,
says the last one shall be first.
Well, if that verse is true,
there's hope for me and you.
-Kevin Kerby

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laoghaire

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Re: iTunes debacle epilogue
« Reply #12 on: September 01, 2020, 11:00:35 PM »
The speech was *awesome*. It hit all the notes. Words. Phrasing. Delivery. Rhetorical repitition. Emotion. Facial expressions and body language. Righteousness. It had a way of including people in on it, a way we could pretty much all agree.

And the music was also very powerful. Starting with the stripped down song and then blowing into the full band ass kicking just really lit it up. (Yes, I know we lose Larry's intro and that is a big loss but what they did made up for it).

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MPare1966

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Re: iTunes debacle epilogue
« Reply #13 on: September 01, 2020, 11:05:32 PM »
Quick question SS: how long did it take you, after that initial R&H SBS, to dive into War?
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SwimmingSorrows

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Re: iTunes debacle epilogue
« Reply #14 on: September 02, 2020, 01:14:18 AM »
The speech was *awesome*. It hit all the notes. Words. Phrasing. Delivery. Rhetorical repitition. Emotion. Facial expressions and body language. Righteousness. It had a way of including people in on it, a way we could pretty much all agree.

And the music was also very powerful. Starting with the stripped down song and then blowing into the full band ass kicking just really lit it up. (Yes, I know we lose Larry's intro and that is a big loss but what they did made up for it).

Bono's vocals in the stripped down first half as well... holy shit.  One of my favorite vocal performances from anyone ever, so much emotion.  I agree, totally worth it.  They also kinda give us Larry's intro towards the end when it comes back in for the final chorus. 
There's a bible verse,
says the last one shall be first.
Well, if that verse is true,
there's hope for me and you.
-Kevin Kerby